Queens Road in Westmead is Parramatta Council's first on-road separated cycleway

On your bike: Parramatta lord mayor Andrew Wilson and Seven Hills MP Mark Taylor with cyclists Darryn Capes-Davis and Janett Clarkson in Queens Road, Westmead. Picture: Parramatta Council
On your bike: Parramatta lord mayor Andrew Wilson and Seven Hills MP Mark Taylor with cyclists Darryn Capes-Davis and Janett Clarkson in Queens Road, Westmead. Picture: Parramatta Council

Parramatta Council’s first on-road separated cycleway is now  giving riders a safe journey between Parramatta Park and the T-Way cycleway.

The 300 metre section of cycleway along Queens Road in Westmead completes one of the key missing links in the T-Way cycleway that runs almost completely off-road from Windsor to Parramatta.

The new section separates cyclists from traffic.

“Sharing the road with cars is the greatest barrier to participation in cycling, particularly for younger or older members of the community,” Parramatta lord mayor Andrew Wilson said.

Enhancing safety on our cycleways will encourage a broader section of the community to take up cycling whether it be for work, fun or recreation. Figures show that monthly usage has doubled on the recently opened Subiaco Creek link on the Parramatta Valley Cycleway. In the past year alone more than 175,000 cyclists have used the foreshore path.”

The council has invested more than $5 million into developing cycle and pedestrian networks since 2015.

“Our research shows that Queens Road is the most popular route into the Parramatta CBD from the west, with up to 100 cyclists using the link daily, and we expect this number to increase significantly with the new cycleway,” Cr Wilson said.

The council funded Queens Road project included road resurfacing and was completed with no loss of street parking.

Westmead resident Colin Morris had doubts about the project before work started earlier this year. His concerns included low numbers of cyclists using Queens Road, a detrimental impact on the streetscape and impact on the traffic flows of commercial vehicles and visitors in the busy health precinct.

“I’m not against cycleways,” Mr Morris told the Sun in April.

“But the logic isn’t there. The project will narrow Queens Road to a similar width of neighbouring streets and this will lead to many disruptions for many visitors.”

The community is invited to attend the official opening of the cycleway on October 19, 11am-1pm for a free sausage sizzle and bicycle powered smoothies, as well as a complimentary bike mechanic service.

Other recently completed cycleway projects include the Subiaco Creek link, Shepherd’s Wharf at the end of Park Road in Rydalmere, Baludarri Wetlands Boardwalk from Parramatta’s Rangihou Reserve to James Ruse Drive via heritage-listed wetlands and connecting to Western Sydney University.

Upcoming projects include separation of walking and cycling along the Rydalmere foreshore, a new pedestrian and cyclist bridge over Parramatta River between James Ruse Drive and Macarthur Street and improved connection for cyclists between Epping and Carlingford stations.

Previous story: http://www.parramattasun.com.au/story/4593080/cycleway-is-on-track/