Nurse at The Children's Hospital Westmead rewarded for her work

In good hands: For the last seven years, Elizabeth Ingold has worked in the Grace Centre for Newborn Care at The Children's Hospital at Westmead.

In good hands: For the last seven years, Elizabeth Ingold has worked in the Grace Centre for Newborn Care at The Children's Hospital at Westmead.

Meet Elizabeth Ingold - she might have Sydney's hardest job but it’s also the most rewarding.

The 31-year-old was awarded the Sydney Children’s Hospital Network’s ‘Above and Beyond All Expectation Award for Excellence’ on Friday, May 13 coinciding with International Nurses Day. 

Ms Ingold works in a discharge role at the Grace Centre for Newborn Care at The Children’s Hospital at Westmead where she prepares families for their return home.

She believes this is why she was recognised. 

“Obviously every family is a little bit different in what their needs are going to be,” she told the Sun.

“There is a lot of education involved in my role.”

Ms Ingold remembers one family who were thinking of moving back to the UK with their baby who had complex needs.

“A large part of my role was coordinating their care to make sure that the family felt comfortable and supported once they left to then be able to move internationally with their baby who had a lot of complex needs,” she said. 

As part of her prize, Ms Ingold received a leadership training course at the Australian College of Nursing. 

“I love the atmosphere of working with kids who can get better and go home,” she said.

“It is way more positive a lot of the time and I find it really rewarding watching babies get well.”

Being in the discharge nurse role for the last year has been a very rewarding time for the South Penrith resident. 

“Over the last year I have found it has been really lovely being the person who brings the good news to the families - that they are going to be going home soon,” she said. 

The Grace Centre for Newborn Care cares for about 23 babies at one time. Once children move beyond neonatal intensive care, they are moved to other parts of the hospital. 

“In Grace, we don’t see a lot of premature babes, we see babies with complex needs, so babies who have had surgery or complex medical needs within the first hours of life,” Ms Ingold said. 

“For many families it’s the only place in the whole state that can care for their babies.”

The most challenging part of her role is changing the care plans for each baby depending on what that family needs.

“There is no way I would ever think of doing anything else,” she said.

There is no way I would ever think of doing anything else. - Elizabeth Ingold

Smartphone
Tablet - Narrow
Tablet - Wide
Desktop