No amalgamations: former Holroyd mayor

Former Holroyd mayor Allan Ezzy believes a forced council amalgamation will fracture the community and create a ‘‘mega city’’.

The long-time councillor and Greystanes resident is concerned residents will receive limited access in times of need if the state government merges Holroyd council with Parramatta, Auburn and Ryde.

Allan Ezzy, former Holroyd mayor, at Kippax Street Park, Greystanes.

Allan Ezzy, former Holroyd mayor, at Kippax Street Park, Greystanes.

"It's going to cause a lot of problems when Holroyd residents can't get direct access to the information they need or speak to someone about their local issues," Mr Ezzy said.

"That's going to be the case if we're forced to be a mega city of almost 480,000 people and let's face it nobody wants to feel like just another number.

"Having seen this happen in England and Scotland too, sooner or later, people on the fringes will get disinterested and you'll see Holroyd's community spirit killed off.

"Holroyd is a place that encourages people to be involved in their community and it's been the same story for the 43 years I've lived here.’’

In 1985 during his first term as mayor, the Order of Australia recipient was part of a successful campaign to ensure Holroyd remained a separate entity from Parramatta council.

"We're financially sound, there's good management, the community has access to a range of facilities, and that could all be lost if we're forced to merge with other areas who won't invest or maintain the things we love about Holroyd."

Asked by the Sun for his stance on the issue, Parramatta lord mayor John Chedid said we "need to keep an open mind" on mergers and that it was an option that would give ratepayers "better value".

"It makes sense to at least consider options that would help us give ratepayers better value by delivering services and facilities more cost effectively," Cr Chedid said.

"We really need to consider whether having more than 40 councils in the Sydney region remains the best model for local government in the 21st Century.”      

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