New recruits: Holroyd Parramatta Rosehill

As the youngest of four siblings, Miriam was always the “baby” of her western-Sydney family, but the tables have turned since she decided to join the NSW Police Force.

Ms Camagay, 23, (right) was one of more than 182 probationary constables welcomed into the NSW Police Force at an attestation parade at Goulburn on Friday.

Ms Camagay, 23, (right) was one of more than 182 probationary constables welcomed into the NSW Police Force at an attestation parade at Goulburn on Friday.

Ms Camagay, 23, was one of more than 182 probationary constables welcomed into the NSW Police Force at an attestation parade at Goulburn on Friday.

After her graduation, Ms Camagay will join Holroyd police as a probationary constable.

While Miriam will attest today, her second-eldest sibling – sister Giselle, 29 – is in the class behind her at the academy.

“It was nice to have my big sister here with me, but I’ll admit it was also fun to boss her around, teach her what I’ve learned, and tell her what to expect,” Ms Camagay said.

Interestingly, it was studying for a different qualification – a diploma in mental health – that made Miriam realise she wanted to be a police officer.

“I realised that I wanted to be the first in line when it came to helping the community, instead of being second in line.”

On Friday, NSW Police Commissioner Andrew Scipione welcomed Ms Camagay and the rest of the new recruits from “Class 321” of the Associate Degree in Policing Practice, who will begin work as probationary constables in various local area commands this morning.

Holroyd police will receive three new recruits, Parramatta will receive three and Rosehill will get three.

“I could not be prouder of the men and women who are joining our ranks today,” Commissioner Scipione said.

“They are about to embark on a career that they will find to be as rewarding as it is challenging."

The probationary constables will now complete 12 months’ on-the-job training, along with additional study by distance education with Charles Sturt University. They will then officially graduate with their associate degree and be confirmed in the rank of constable.

The recruits come from a diverse range of cultural backgrounds. While many were born in Australia, others hail from countries as varied as China, Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Belgium, France, India, Iran, Vietnam, Italy, Lebanon, Netherlands and South Africa. Sixteen identify as being from an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander background.

The recruits also vary widely in age – from 19 to 53 – as well as where they live.

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