Whimsical sport is not for the faint-hearted

MAGIC didn't quite happen when our home team took to the pitch in Parramatta for the Australian Quidditch Association's national championships.

Twelve broom-laden teams from around the country competed in the two-day tournament at the University of Western Sydney's Parramatta campus.

Though the UWS Thestrals were favourites to qualify for next year's World Cup in the US, they were swept out of contention in the quarter-finals.

Hannah Monty, who plays chaser for the Thestrals, said the Melbourne Manticores put on a spellbinding performance.

"We bombed out in the quarter-finals. Too many injuries and not enough players, but it was a really good weekend," Ms Monty said.

Quidditch may have originated in a whimsical world, but it is not a sport for the faint-hearted.

There's nothing fictional about the injuries — there were more suffered than during the hedge maze at the Triwizard Tournament.

Ms Monty injured three toes during a match, and other players finished the tournament with broken thumbs, dislocated knees and fractured ankles.

The Thestrals' hopes of making it to the world cup haven't been grounded just yet, although they finished the tournament in sixth place.

They could take the place of one of the top four teams - Perth Phoenixes, Macquarie Marauders, Newcastle Fireballs and Sydney Unspeakables - if they can't compete in the cup. In the meantime they're going to have a break.

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